Are Immigrant And Out-Of-State Workers Covered By Workers' Compensation?

If you were injured at work in Georgia but don't live here, do you still have a workers' compensation claim? This is a question we hear a lot at The Law Office of Bryan S. Hawkins. There are issues to consider, but generally the answer is yes.

Georgia law requires every employer with three or more employees to carry workers' compensation insurance. If you were the employee of a Georgia company with three or more employees when you were injured, you qualify for workers' comp benefits.

This is true for out-of-state workers of all kinds. For example, if you lived in Alabama and were hired by a Georgia company, your injuries should be covered. If you live in this state and your Georgia employer sent you to Alabama for a special project, your injuries should be covered.

Each state maintains its own workers' compensation system to which employers contribute through their insurance premiums. Generally, the state you live in or even the state you work in does not matter. What matters is whether you work for a Georgia company.

Immigrant workers are covered by workers' compensation — even undocumented workers. Your immigration status has no effect on your eligibility. It is also illegal for employers to retaliate against you for claiming benefits for work injuries.

At The Law Office of Bryan S. Hawkins, our attorneys are committed to helping all injured workers obtain the full amount of workers' compensation benefits they are entitled to. We will investigate your situation, advise you of your rights and fight for you at every level.

Contact Us Now For A Free, Confidential Consultation

If you have been hurt at work and need sound advice and protective representation, contact us for a free consultation with a lawyer. A consultation with us is completely confidential, and we can provide translation services if necessary. To set yours up, call our office in Augusta at 706-305-1130 or fill out our online contact form and we will respond to you promptly.