Georgia sees its fair share of workplace-related injuries, similarly to any other state. In 2015, the rate of workplace injuries in Georgia was 2.7 out of every 100 workers while the national rate was 3.0 out of every 100. This data comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

There are many nuances of filing a personal injury claim. One concern many people have for good reason is the feeling of someone watching them. There are cases where various entities watch injured people carefully to see if the injuries are actually as bad as claimed. There are a number of ways other parties will accumulate this information, whether it is through surveillance footage or the person’s own social media account. 

Insurance company

Similarly to auto accidents, an insurance agency will collect additional information to ensure everything they received from the client is accurate. This is a normal part of the process, and as long as the person does not lie, then he or she will have nothing to worry about. However, an insurance company may exaggerate information. For instance, if a person claims to suffer from partial limited mobility and a representative from the agency finds a person walking perfectly normal, then the company can use that as evidence the person is not as badly injured as first claimed. 

Another party’s legal team

In the event an accident goes to court, then the other party’s attorneys will gather as much evidence as they can. This team looks for the same information as the insurance companies: anything showing the person was not badly hurt. 

In either scenario, the investigator should not interfere with a person’s day-to-day life. Perhaps the investigator will merely watch the person’s house from a parked car from a distance. This can be disconcerting, and if a person starts to worry about safety, then he or she can contact the police to see why the person is in the car.