Every state has different laws governing workplace injuries. There are particular industries where workers are more susceptible to workplace injuries, such as construction workers, nurses and health care workers, janitors, and factory workers. People who work with heavy equipment or work in hazardous workplaces are at a higher risk for injury than the average employee.

If you suffer an injury on the job, you may immediately fear you may lose your job. That can lead to a whole series of other stressful worries, such as how you will pay your bills, how long you will have to stay out of work and how you will recover lost wages. In a time when you should be able to rest and recuperate, these fears can become overwhelming and cause you lots of anxiety. The good news is that you do have options and there are solutions.

Georgia law and workplace injuries

Georgia workers should not worry that a workplace injury will cause them to lose their jobs. Georgia law protects workers who suffer on-the-job injuries that lead to time off work and lost wages. State law requires that employers with three or more employees carry workers’ compensation insurance. Your employer must by law to carry this insurance that protects you in the event of an injury on the job, and coverage starts from your very first day at work. 

How your benefits could be jeopardized

You may think that you should not tell your employer about your injury because you are afraid that if you do you will lose your job. However, not telling your employer about your injury could actually harm your chances to receive workers’ compensation benefits. You should tell your employer as soon as you are aware of the injury. 

Because the law regarding workers’ compensation in Georgia is actually very complex, the best option for you in moving forward is to consult with an attorney specialized in workers’ compensation law. A lawyer in this area can help you understand your case and present you with the options available to you for recovering lost wages and getting help with paying medical bills.